Archive for May, 2010

Panel Resources: Climate and Land Use Looking Forward

May 11, 2010
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Mitigating Climate Change Through Food and Land Use

More than 30 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions arise from the land use sector. Thus, no strategy for mitigating global climate change can be complete or successful without reducing emissions from agriculture, forestry, and other land uses. Moreover, only land-based or “terrestrial” carbon sequestration offers the possibility today of large-scale removal of greenhouse gases from the atmosphere, through plant photosynthesis.

Link to the full article by Ecoagriculture Partners here

Good Practice Guidance for Land Use, Land Change, and Forestry

This report on Good Practice Guidance for Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry (GPG-LULUCF) is the response to the invitation by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to develop good practice guidance for land use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF).

Read the full article published by the IPCC here

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Panel Resources: State of Emerging Environmental Markets

May 11, 2010
By admin

There are many fundamental questions about the the state of the current voluntary carbon markets such as transaction volumes, credit prices, project types, locations, and themotivations of buyers in this market.  Over the past several years, these markets havenot only become an opportunity for citizen consumer action, but also an alternativesource of carbon finance and an incubator for carbon market innovation.

As the voluntary carbon markets have rapidly gained traction, the answers, to these questionshave become increasingly important to investors, policymakers, and environmentalistsalike. For example, since the last edition of this report, we have seen various U.S. climate bills make reference to voluntary carbon offset standards, the Japanesegovernment launch a voluntary carbon-offsetting scheme, and the U.K. governmentissue an official definition of “carbon neutral.”

Proving the legitimacy of carbon offset projects remains a major issue in themarketplace, leading to a so-called “flight to quality.”  Last year saw further establishmentand greater functionality of voluntary offset standards; the emergence of new registries; the forging of new partnerships between infrastructure providers; the formation ofcoalitions to encourage self-regulation; and increased market transparency.

At the same time, existing and potential voluntary market consumers became more sophisticated asliterature and education around offset quality increased. All of this points to a furthermaturation of the market in 2008. However, simultaneously, the voluntary carbon markets, like any other commodity market, were not immune to the over-arching forcesof the economy and regulatory developments.

To read the full State of the Voluntary Carbon Markets report, click here

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Panel Resources: Forest Carbon and REDD Architecture

May 11, 2010
By admin

Forestry projects jump-started the global carbon offset market in the early 1990s, when environmental non-profits and industrial companies initiated partnerships to conserve and plant forests with the aim of balancing greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) by capturing carbon in trees. Although forestry transactions were the first-ever carbon offsets, they were soon sidelined in emerging global GHG regulations and a narrow band of forestry offsets were recognized under the Kyoto Protocol.

This left the voluntary markets to pick up the slack. Some buyers have been drawn to this tangible, land-based offset category and others have veered away from the complexities and risks of forest carbon offset projects. Over time, however, the role of forests in mitigating climate change has increasingly gained credence – thanks largely to the resolution of scientific disputes over how to measure and monitor the amount of carbon captured in trees, as well asgrowing political consensus on the need to reduce emissions as quickly and cost-effectively as possible.

This acceptance has begun to impact global climate policy. In 2007, at international climate change negotiations, the Bali Action Plan laid out a strategy for developing consensus on how to recognize reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD). In 2009, the Copenhagen Accord explicitly stated the need to develop mechanisms that would reward sustainable land-use practices that capture carbon in trees. Around the same time, landbased carbon offsets were explicitly included in the text of proposed US climate bills. These regulatory developments have the potential to stimulate tremendous demand for land-based carbon credits.

Currently, the forest carbon market is diverse on both the supply and demand fronts. Many offsets have been developed and purchased
purely for the sake of philanthropy, while others have been created as commodity products to be sold as units of trade on global regulated and voluntary markets. In this context suppliers employ significantly varying project designs, methodologies and implementation strategies to create credits.

To read the full State of the Forest Carbon Market report, click here

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Speaker Biography: Kerry ten Kate, Director, BBOP

May 10, 2010
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Kerry Ten Kate is Director of Forest Trends’ Business and Biodiversity Offset Program. Kerry joined the Secretariat of the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in 1990. Subsequently, as Policy Adviser to Kew’s Director, she advised the UK and other governments on the Convention on Biological Diversity and sustainable development strategies. From 1999 to 2002, she was a member of the UK delegation to the negotiation of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture and negotiating sessions of the CBD. From November 2002 to September 2006, Kerry was Director of Investor Responsibility at Insight Investment. She writes, broadcasts occasionally for BBC Radio 4, is Senior Visiting Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies of the UN University, a member of IUCN’s Species Survival Commission and on the Steering Committee of the Global Biodiversity Forum. She is also a member of the UK Government’s Darwin Advisory Committee.

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Speaker Biography: David Brand, Managing Director, New Forests

May 10, 2010
By admin

David Brand has over 25 years’ experience in business management, investment management, science, public policy, public administration and international affairs. David Brand is the founder of New Forests Pty Limited and is currently a member of the Board of Directors of the Washington, DC-based organisation Forest Trends and of Environment Business Australia. Previously he was director of the New Forests Program with Hancock Natural Resource Group (HNRG). Prior to joining HNRG, David was the Executive General Manager of State Forests of NSW. In that position he was active in
supporting the development of carbon trading in New South Wales, Australia. From 1985 to 1995 he worked with the Canadian Forest Service as a scientist, director of scientific programs and ultimately as national Director-General of Science and Sustainable Development. He has a Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia and a Bachelor of Science, Forestry
from the University of Toronto in Canada.

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Speaker Biography: Carlos Muñoz Piña, Director, INE

May 10, 2010
By admin

Carlos Muñoz Piña is currently the director of Environmental Economics and Public Policy Research at the Instituto Nacional de Ecología (INE), the research agency of the Mexican Ministry of Natural Resources and the Environment. At INE, the research team he leads has prepared several initiatives on environmental taxes and other economic instruments for environmental policy. He has also worked as an economist for the government of Mexico, the World Bank, the London Environmental Economics Centre, with internships at the North American Commission for  Environmental Cooperation in Montreal and the Resources Renewal Institute in San Francisco.  Carlos has published papers on topics related to the economics of rural migration, environmental taxes, common property resources, poverty and the environment, economic valuation of ecosystems, water economics and policy and the payment of environmental services. He is an economist graduated from the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM) in Mexico City, with an MSc. in Environmental Economics at University College London, and a Ph.D. in Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California at Berkeley.

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Speaker Biography: Michael Crowe, Policy Analyst, DSE Victoria

May 10, 2010
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Michael Crow is a senior Policy Analyst, with the Department of Sustainability and Environment (DSE), Victoria. He was involved in the development of the BushTender concept and was part of the team that planned and conducted the first two BushTender trials. He has since been working on the development of BushBroker, a native vegetation credit registration and trading scheme that will increase flexibility for securing third party offsets under the native vegetation retentions controls. The Victorian Government recently announced its intention to establish the BushBroker. Michael is currently involved in the development of additional mechanisms for the management of native vegetation, particularly in urban growth areas.

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Speaker Biography: Joerg Siefert Granzin, Forest Trends

May 10, 2010
By admin

Joerg Seifert-Granzin is a senior economist specialized in spatiotemporal analysis and valuation of environmental services. He has more than 15 years of experience in economic research on developing countries. Currently, he is advising different activities reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) of Forest Trends-Katoomba Group. Having been recruited as an integrated expert by the German Development Cooperation (GTZ), Mr. Seifert-Granzin coordinated the scientific and technical development of remote sensing, biomass measurement, and econometric modeling tools facilitating the implementation of national and subnational REDDs schemes in Bolivia and Cameroon.  Apart, he supervised subnational adaptation activities in the Bolivian lowlands. As FAN Bolivia’s Coordinator of Noel Kempff Mercado Climate Action Project he guided the certification process, revised the methodologies applied and edited the Project Design Document. Together with FAN’s environmental services’ team he conducted research on hydrological services and designed projects to conserve them.

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Open Forum

May 10, 2010
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Prior to the Cocktail Reception delegates will have the opportunity to meet other delegates working in the same field and with similar interests. Katoomba conference team member, Ben Metz, will facilitate these connections with some pre-cocktail reception networking.

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Resource: Paying for Environmental Services – A Trial in Vietnam

May 8, 2010
By admin

This report, published by the University of Connecticut Department of Economics, explores the challenges facing developing countries in balancing the needs of rural people with the demands of nature conservation.  The report presents the findings from a study undertaken in Vietnam’s uplands, engaging with local communities with a PES programme.

The report is available for download here.

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